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January
30
sexpigeon:

Path puts a silly amount of trust in its avatars, especially given their tiny size. I never know who the shoes are.

Path is more tappy than typey. That’s fine, I suppose. It certainly makes for a clean flow.

Path is tappy and its content reads like the content of taps. “I am in a place,” you tap. “:)”, come the replies.

Path is pretty in the same designy way as our modern museums. They are shaped like battleships and grain silos and crumpled souffles. There is much said about flow and fatigue and how one of these has been optimized and the other one reduced.

These museums are very exciting when they open. You show up and marvel along with all of the other fans of architecture. Maybe you return for one of those nights where they stay open late and there is a band and drinking. “A great space,” you think. Maybe one day you’ll be rich and rent out the atrium for a private party.

The art doesn’t get talked about so much at these museums. The museum itself is the “social object,” as it were.

Eventually the particulars around which the museum was designed fall out of fashion. A fresh crop of architects finds it to be too flashy, or too dull, or to have been guided by faulty principles. There is congestion where there should be flow. Certain rooms are simply exhausting. Maybe it is even an eyesore.

This is good for the museum. Now they can really fuck up the place. Fill a room with a thousand cubic feet of lead. Let Matthew Barney dangle from a rope and scribble some shit high on a wall where no one can see it. Or: just let their rooms be dull rooms filled with rousing art.

Path is a monument to Path. It is no place to scribble in. I wish it longevity so that it might find shabbiness.

sexpigeon:

Path puts a silly amount of trust in its avatars, especially given their tiny size. I never know who the shoes are.

Path is more tappy than typey. That’s fine, I suppose. It certainly makes for a clean flow.

Path is tappy and its content reads like the content of taps. “I am in a place,” you tap. “:)”, come the replies.

Path is pretty in the same designy way as our modern museums. They are shaped like battleships and grain silos and crumpled souffles. There is much said about flow and fatigue and how one of these has been optimized and the other one reduced.

These museums are very exciting when they open. You show up and marvel along with all of the other fans of architecture. Maybe you return for one of those nights where they stay open late and there is a band and drinking. “A great space,” you think. Maybe one day you’ll be rich and rent out the atrium for a private party.

The art doesn’t get talked about so much at these museums. The museum itself is the “social object,” as it were.

Eventually the particulars around which the museum was designed fall out of fashion. A fresh crop of architects finds it to be too flashy, or too dull, or to have been guided by faulty principles. There is congestion where there should be flow. Certain rooms are simply exhausting. Maybe it is even an eyesore.

This is good for the museum. Now they can really fuck up the place. Fill a room with a thousand cubic feet of lead. Let Matthew Barney dangle from a rope and scribble some shit high on a wall where no one can see it. Or: just let their rooms be dull rooms filled with rousing art.

Path is a monument to Path. It is no place to scribble in. I wish it longevity so that it might find shabbiness.

(Source: sexpigeon)


This post has 823 notes.







July
06
letterheady:

Bill Watterson, 1991 | Source
Bill Watterson’s letterhead, as used in the early-90s. A previous design, used in the late-80s, can be seen here. 
(Bill turns 53 today. Happy birthday!)

letterheady:

Bill Watterson, 1991 | Source

Bill Watterson’s letterhead, as used in the early-90s. A previous design, used in the late-80s, can be seen here

(Bill turns 53 today. Happy birthday!)


This post has 166 notes.



June
16
brianwood:

I am offering a free download of the entire 132-page Public Domain 2 artbook.  It’s about 115 megs, nicely high res, and looks great imported onto my iphone and ipad.  It represents about a decade of sketches and random art.
If you like it, please pick up a copy of the signed and numbered ltd ed print book!  Khepri’s selling the remaining stock, both editions, and its the only place you can pick it up.  There will be no further editions of the book beyond this.  Also be sure to check out the mini-screenprints.
Enjoy!
Click to download (direct link to pdf, right-click to save)

brianwood:

I am offering a free download of the entire 132-page Public Domain 2 artbook.  It’s about 115 megs, nicely high res, and looks great imported onto my iphone and ipad.  It represents about a decade of sketches and random art.

If you like it, please pick up a copy of the signed and numbered ltd ed print book!  Khepri’s selling the remaining stock, both editions, and its the only place you can pick it up.  There will be no further editions of the book beyond this.  Also be sure to check out the mini-screenprints.

Enjoy!

Click to download (direct link to pdf, right-click to save)


This post has 1,776 notes.



December
19
The Two Best Things on the Web 2010

viafrank:

Late last week I started drafting a list of my favorite things on the web from this year. After a review of the list, I realized most of it was droll, forgettable, ephemeral, and not really worth documenting in the grand scheme of things. Basically, it mattered at the time of its release, but time had not treated these things well: they were more flow than stock.

My top two choices, however, stood tall as perhaps the best stock I’ve had the pleasure of reading on the web, both in terms of their scope, but more interestingly about how they treated their content and audience. There’s a pattern here that I enjoy. I’d like to introduce you to them, and hopefully in the process make a bit of a point about the direction I want the web to take in the next year. I’m optimistic.

Top Two Things on the Web in 2010

Read More

(via viafrank-deactivated20120702)


This post has 61 notes.



October
10
agentmlovestacos:

Steampunk Iron Man, the Marvel Costume Contest Winner at New York Comic Con 2010. Wow. Photo by Judy Stephens.

agentmlovestacos:

Steampunk Iron Man, the Marvel Costume Contest Winner at New York Comic Con 2010. Wow. Photo by Judy Stephens.


This post has 4,598 notes.



July
01
graphicly:

hello-zombie:

holy crapsomeone modded their scooter into the GREATEST SCOOTER EVER
io9

graphicly:

hello-zombie:

holy crap
someone modded their scooter into the GREATEST SCOOTER EVER

io9


This post has 64 notes.



May
27
graphicly:

threadless:

kevinnuut:

Iron Man.
Designed by a.d.17, this shirt is up for voting on Threadless.  Personally, I don’t know how you can’t give it a 4 or a 5, it is adorable and sharp.


Iron Man shirt doesn’t look too happy.

graphicly:

threadless:

kevinnuut:

Iron Man.

Designed by a.d.17, this shirt is up for voting on Threadless.  Personally, I don’t know how you can’t give it a 4 or a 5, it is adorable and sharp.

Iron Man shirt doesn’t look too happy.


This post has 286 notes.